Opus Examples

Audio samples

These samples demonstrate the quality achievable with Opus. They are have been encoded with Opus and then decoded back to wav so that any browser can play them. The bitrates indicated are target bitrates, i.e. the average that would be achieved on a large audio collection.

Opus speech samples, various bitrates

Playback: [ uncompressed | 8 kb/s (nb) | 12 kb/s (mb) | 16 kb/s (wb) | 24 kb/s (swb) | 32 kb/s (fb) ]

Download: [ uncompressed | 8 kb/s (nb) | 12 kb/s (mb) | 16 kb/s (wb) | 24 kb/s (swb) | 32 kb/s (fb) ]


Opus stereo music samples, various bitrates

Playback: [ uncompressed | 48 kb/s VBR | 64 kb/s VBR | 96 kb/s VBR | 128 kb/s VBR ]

Download: [ uncompressed | 48 kb/s VBR | 64 kb/s VBR | 96 kb/s VBR | 128 kb/s VBR ]


Packet loss robustness at 24 kb/s wideband, 30% loss

Playback: [ no loss | Opus 30% loss | Opus 30% loss with FEC | AMR-WB 30 % loss ]

Download: [ no loss | Opus 30% loss | Opus 30% loss with FEC | AMR-WB 30 % loss ]

Bitrate scalability

The following example demonstrates what happens when gradually varying the bitrate from 8 kb/s to 64 kb/s. It's an extreme example, but it shows how Opus can change bandwidth and bitrate seamlessly without any glitch. In practical applications, bitrate changes are expected to occur much more slowly.


Bitrate

Audio bandwidth

Example of use in a web page

Opus works with the <audio> element just like vorbis.

For example, this code in a web page:

 <audio src="ehren-paper_lights-96.opus" controls>

displays an embedded player that can play an Opus file.


Paper Lights by Ehren Starks, encoded at 96 kb/s Creative Commons License

For now, this only works with Firefox 15 or later.

Live HTTP streams

These streams can be played in using Firefox (version 15 or higher), foobar2000, Gstreamer/Totem (in Linux), or using opusdec from the command-line.


Hypnotic torture clock
Mono 12kbit/sec
A rhythmic electronic chant of the current time. Prolonged exposure to this Temporal Fugue is not recommended. The stream is synthesized in real-time using boodler and encoded using opusenc and streamed using oggfwd and icecast.
Endless drone
Stereo 64kbit/sec
A simulation of an FM3 Buddha Machine, this stream produces an endless stream of peaceful droning. The stream is synthesized in real-time using boodler and encoded using opusenc and streamed using oggfwd and icecast.
There is also a list of Opus internet radio streams on the icecast directory.